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Are Gig Workers Happy?

Friday, December 1, 2017

Gig workers don’t earn as much as full-time employees, according to a Prudential study, which defines gig workers as those who work for themselves and provide a service or labor. On average, gig workers earn $36,500 a year versus the $62,700 earned by full-time employees.

That’s not the only drawback to gig work. There's also the lack of employer-sponsored benefits such as health insurance and retirement plans. That may be why only 44% of gig workers say they are satisfied with their work situation versus 55% of full-time employees. But there are differences in attitudes by age of gig worker.

Most Millennial (aged 18 to 34) and Boomer (aged 56-plus) gig workers are satisfied with their work – 67 and 75%, respectively. Many Millennial gig workers say they are using their gig status to move forward on their long-term aspirations. Many Boomer gig workers say they are using it to better prepare for retirement or to supplement their retirement income.

Gen Xers (aged 36 to 55) are the least satisfied with their gig work (45%). Most Gen Xers say it's just a way to pay the bills. They are more interested than younger or older gig workers in switching to traditional work and most likely to say they are struggling financially.

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